People are understandably curious about the reasons why people start on this long journey. Below, visitors of our site posted their motivation of walking the camino.

Joanie Hess

Why I did this hike in the first place was really all about family— my own family, my extended family, my human family. I learned about the camino in a 5th grade reader (I attended a Catholic parochial school). It was a story about two children, one destined to stay in the then Spanish colony of St. Augustine Florida and the other to return to Spain. “Remember St. James and Spain,” the one bid the other farewell. On and off over the years, I came across articles about it and thought, someday I’ll do this myself! My fears, frustrations, sweat and toil doing this were offered for a brother who disappeared on Saturday, October 15, 1966. He was an 8th grade student who had just finished delivering papers on his newspaper route, stopped by home briefly and then went out again on his bike a 3:30 p.m. to meet his best friend. He never arrived. He and his belongings were never found. A proper police investigation was not done because a few days later, some classmates told the police they thought they saw my brother and ran after him “but couldn’t catch him.” So he was simply listed as a runaway. This was something he would not have done— he would not have run out on the family or his best friend. He was my good buddy as well. I was about 5 years older than he and had a minor surgery a few weeks before he disappeared. He would get ice packs for me, take my mail up to me and that sort of stuff. Like I said, he would have never run out on us like that. I knew from the start that this was foul play. The laws regarding responsibilities of the police for a missing child were very weak at the time, something that has since been partially corrected, although the handling of such cases in the United States has yet to be standardized. Several attempts were made to get the police to look at this case again, but to no avail. But thirty-some years later, I was able to get the police to reopen this case and their efforts led to him to finally be listed with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in Alexandria, Virginia. Although I have little hope that this case will be “solved,” at least I know that stones are being unturned with ruling out that he survived whatever happened to him and DNA matches on remains that crop up and that sort of thing. Good investigators are working on this and their personal causes were added to my list of intentions that were placed at the tomb of St. James. My list from friends, neighbors, and co-workers was a rather long typed list. I hand-wrote wishes to extend blessings to people that I met along the way, genuine people who cared. Service workers and locals alike. Since my brother’s body was never found, no Requiem Mass was ever said for him and my walk was done en lieu of such. It’s been difficult due to lack of closure.

Leticia Gomez

I have been planning to do this walk for the last 10 years and was able to finally do it last year. I started March 4, 2007 and Finished April 4, 2007. It was everything I expected and more!!! I had horrible feet problems that almost prevented me from continuing El Camino on my 7th day of walking but I did and I am so glad I did!!! All the pain was worth it and would love to do it again!! I found myself, I found peace, I saw all the beautiful things that life has to offer and I met wonderful people!!!

Mirian Zucarello

I´ll be doing the Camino again in May 2008 leaving from Le Puy…I´m looking for companhy to cross the Pyrinnes….. Please, leave a msg at : mizu@bol.com.br

Joanie Hess

I walked the Portuguese route in July, 2006 and what follows is why I did this hike in the first place. It was really all about family—my own family, my extended family, my human family. I learned about the camino in a 4th grade reader (I attended a Catholic parochial school). It was a story about two children, one destined to stay in the then Spanish colony of St. Augustine, Florida and the other to return to Spain. “Remember St. James and Spain,” the one bid the other farewell. A sidebar explained the story of the Santiago pilgrimage. I remember being quite impressed with the story. On and off over the years, I came across articles about it and thought, someday I’ll do this myself! But it wasn’t until I was touring the Basque region in Navarra in 2000 that I ran into someone who actually walked the camino. A young woman about 25 years old, who was a tour-guide at the cathedral in Hondarribia, told me of her experiences doing the camino herself. Hearing her speak of it gave me hope of accomplishing this journey. So here I was doing it for myself.

My fears, frustrations, sweat and toil doing this were offered for my brother, Anthony P. Tumolo, Jr. who disappeared 40 years ago on one crisp October Saturday. He was an 8th grade student who had just finished delivering papers on his newspaper route, stopped by home briefly and then went out again on his bike a 3:30 p.m. to meet his best friend. He never arrived. He and his belongings were never found. A proper police investigation was not done because two days later, some classmates told the police they saw my brother and ran after him “but couldn’t catch him.” It was a story that would ring out a grain of truth because the whole school knew that my brother was the fastest runner. Twenty-some years later, one of the classmates confessed that they had made up the whole story to cover for the fact that they were late getting back to class because they were smoking and needed a story to account for the time. So the case was tightly shut and he was simply listed as a runaway. This was something he would not have done—he would not have run out on the family or his best friend. He was my good buddy as well. I was about 5 years older than he and had a minor surgery a few weeks before he disappeared. He would get ice packs for me, take my mail up to me and that sort of stuff. Like I said, he would have never run out on us like that. I knew from the start that this was foul play. The laws regarding responsibilities of the police for a missing child were very weak at the time, something that has since been partially corrected in most areas, although the handling of such cases in the United States has yet to be standardized. Several attempts were made to get the police to look at this case again, to no avail. But thirty some years later, I was able to get the police to reopen this case and their efforts led to him to finally be listed with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in Alexandria, Virginia. Although I have little hope that this case will be “solved,” at least I know that stones are being unturned with ruling out that he survived whatever happened to him and that DNA matches to my mitochondrial DNA could be done on any remains that crop up and that sort of thing. Good investigators are working on this and their personal causes were added to my list of intentions that were placed at the tomb of St. James. My list from friends, neighbors, and co-workers was a rather long typed list. In addition, I hand-wrote wishes to extend blessings to people that I met along the way, genuine people who cared. Service workers and locals alike. Also blessings for all the good folks at American Pilgrims, GoCAMINO site, and those at the Confraternity of St. James site whose technical advice helped make my camino possible. And that’s my story. I hope to do another camino, using a different route this coming spring.

Mírian Zucarello

Todos os que fazem o Caminho de Santiago tem um desejo de “dar um tempo”, um descanso da mesmice da vida, do trabalho, do chefe, do cachorro, o que seja. E esta ruptura se dá por completo uns dias depois de iniciada a jornada. O problema está na volta. Eu levei 3 meses para me re-estabelecer em minha rotina. Sentia muita falta de tudo o que vivi ao longo daqueles mais de um milhao de passos, de abandonar aquela vida comunitária, as pessoas, as flores, a Espanha. E agora vivo nao na ilusão, mas na certeza de votar nas proximas férias a fazer o caminho novamente.

Abraço de Brasil, TODO SE CUMPLE

Marie Lambe

In December 2004, our local newspaper had an article about the Camino in the Sunday travel section. I read the article and was intrigued. I called my daughter, who had spent the prior school year studying abroad in Granada, and asked her about the Camino. She told me that she had heard of it while in Spain and knew a couple of people who had walked it. Then she said to me “You can do it, Mom”. That’s all I had to hear. I went online and bought books on the Camino and began to read. I cut out the article and put it up on my pantry door (it is still there). That Christmas, my daughter was home from college and told me she wanted to walk the Camino with me the next spring. We made plans, got our supplies and off we went. I had never left my husband alone for so long but he was fine with it. I did not know what to expect. I don’t know why I went but I knew that I had to. I couldn’t explain to my friends or family, I just knew that it was something that I had to do. We had lots of support and encouragement but I was 52 years old and in good shape but never had I attempted something so physically, and little did I know, spiritually and psychologically, demanding. I just had to do it. I just had to. We started on April 19, 2005 in SJPP and finished in Santiago on May 24th. It took us 34 days. There were days where I cried, days I was frustrated, days that I was overjoyed. The gamut of emotions was unexpected and unexplicable. Returning home was so very difficult. My daughter and I cried, and I mean sobbed, when we left Santiago. We didn’t want to return. 34 days on the Camino taught us so much. I wish that I had the time to go into this but those of you who have walked know what I mean. I heard someone say that there is the Camino you walk and the Camino you live. Living the Camino is more difficult than walking it. I think that is why I want to go back. There are so many lessons that are learned on the Camino but the routine of everyday life dulls the memory of those lessons. I want to return but alone next time. It was nice being with my daughter because we have a memory that bonds us forever. But I think that walking the Camino alone will give me a different perspective, one that I really want to experience. What called me to the Camino? I don’t know. Did it make any significant changes in my life? In some ways yes and other ways, no. I read once that the changes brought about by the Camino can take years to make themselves known. I don’t know about that. I think that if people want to change, it must be a conscious decision and the experience of the Camino helps those changes to come about. I think about the Camino every day. It is always with me. The memory of my experiences on the Camino, the people I met, the emotions I felt will never leave. Maybe that is what is meant by the Camino we live.

Rami Kattan

The local parish priest organized the cammino for a group of 48 pelligrins to make the last 100km only, I wanted to make part of it at first for many reasons, and I was still reluctant when I went and started it. But later when I was in the cammino reflecting on the sense of doing it, and attending the everyday mass the priest made in the open I understood the real meaning of the cammino and my role in it and in the life, and now 4 days after coming back from the cammino I feel a real change in my life, hoping I remain in this situation forever, and if not I know the cure which is another cammino and surely for a longer distance.

Thanks for Don Daniele who organized the cammino and for the group who acted as a physical and moral support for all of us to continue.

GRAZIE da tutto il mio cuore…

Vincent Kelly

Here in my native Ireland on holidays (I live in England) and regaling my relatives with accounts of my pilgrimages to Santiago I am working on family and other research in a local library. I decided to go to Santiago after much reading about Spain because I had got three Spanish-born grandchildren and I had started to learn Spanish. I was by then just 70 and I had remembered seeing Walter Starkie walking about Dublin dressed, as they said, like an add. for Sandymans port, complete with cape and wide-awake hat. His accounts of life in Spain interested me greatly and I was inspired to explore the Camino for religious and cultural reasons, including the improvement of my Spanish. The grandchildren were quite proud of Grandpa setting out with his rucksack at what they considered to be his old age. That was in 1994 and I had the most wonderful experiences along the way. It changed my life to realise that in many places the local people had nothing yet they shared it willingly in order to help me achieve me in my ambition. It took me 32 days, some easy, but many very hard slogging but rewarding ones. In a small bar in Navarra a local farm worker hugged and with genuine tears told me (on 2nd Sept 1994) that the IRA had declared an “alto de fuego”, a cease-fire. He, as a Basque and understood what it must have meant to me. I even had an interview on Burgos radio and I wonder what they made of my fractured Spanish. However, the experience was so great that my dear wife, now unfortunately no longe with me urged mt to do it again in 1997 when I was 73. And so I did and had two of the most uplifting experiences that a man could haveSo much so that I returned twixe to areas on the Camino that I felt the most at home in. it was on those bleak but wonderful atretches betwen Carrion and Ponferrada. Wonderful people. Time precludes any further reporting but if you have not done you must. I stillhave friends around the world with whom I communicate and we have a gret common bond – one that tells us all just how people of many backgrounds can bond together,where racial and social differences mattered not, even religious ones. I walked for several days with an intriguing orthodox Jewess.

Eleonor Cravero de Argentina

Hice el camino en junio de este año como regalo de mi jubilación. Este fue el motivo inicial. A poco de iniciado el mismo (en Sarria), comencé a advertir que no era sólo eso, que había mucho más que fui develando a medida que peregrinaba. Era mi promer experiencia en este sentido. El camino fue para mi una búsqueda y un encuentro. Uno se encuentra con el silencio, con sus debilidades, con sus fortalezas, con sus amigos y con sus enemigos. Es un encuentro con la solidaridad, donde se borran todos los datos superfluos y queda en andar con el otro y estar cuando lo necesite. Hay tiempo, tiempo para pensar, para ver, para disfrutar, para añorar … En fin es un viaje hacia uno mismo. Para los que no se decidieron, háganlo, es una gran inversión. Eleonor

Christiaan Beeuwkes

St Jean to Santiago. Arrived May 22-06; 32 days. Alone. Why did I go? A year ago I walked across England (Coast 2 Coast) and enjoyed, besides the company of my friends, the countryside, the hosts with whom we stayed, the exercise and of course the pubs at the end of the day. One of the C2C friends had previously walked the Camino and was very encouraging. While I am somewhat envious of those who have a religious faith (it must be comforting to have someone/thing to turn to in joy and dispair) I remain a skeptic! None-the-less I resolved to be open to communication from St. James et al, should He want to talk to me. However I can’t say that He did. At the bus station in Santiago I mentioned this to a Dutchman who was dismayed that I had no faith. “Why haven’t you been visited by a Camino Angel?” I asked how I would know. “Well, for example, it’s when you have lost the path and someone comes along to show you the way.” “Oh yes,” I replied, “many times. Why just at my last Albergue before Santiago I was all set to step into the shower and I couldn’t find my soap. I called out for help and right away two people came forward with soap and shampoo!” “Ah, so you see, said the Dutchman; they were Angles from God!” I thought about this as I showered and wondered why God hadn’t helped me more directly by just showing me where my own soap was rather than making it necessary to trouble these people. Oh well. Another reason for going was that I wanted some separation from a troubled marriage; perhaps I would have some clarity on that by the time I had finished. Well I certainly pondered that and many other significant issues over hours of walking. I do know that I developed a strong feeling of my insignificanse in this world and so I resolved to be more humble. I do feel enriched by all that took place. Would I go again? Absolutely!!

Alex – USA / Spain

I have been planning to do this walk for the last 10 years and was able to finally do it last year. I started March 4, 2007 and Finished April 4, 2007. It was everything I expected and more!!! I had horrible feet problems that almost prevented me from continuing El Camino on my 7th day of walking but I did and I am so glad I did!!! All the pain was worth it and would love to do it again!! I found myself, I found peace, I saw all the beautiful things that life has to offer and I met wonderful people!!!

0

Martha

I have been planning to do this walk for the last 10 years and was able to finally do it last year. I started March 4, 2007 and Finished April 4, 2007. It was everything I expected and more!!! I had horrible feet problems that almost prevented me from continuing El Camino on my 7th day of walking but I did and I am so glad I did!!! All the pain was worth it and would love to do it again!! I found myself, I found peace, I saw all the beautiful things that life has to offer and I met wonderful people!!!

1

Paul King

I have been planning to do this walk for the last 10 years and was able to finally do it last year. I started March 4, 2007 and Finished April 4, 2007. It was everything I expected and more!!! I had horrible feet problems that almost prevented me from continuing El Camino on my 7th day of walking but I did and I am so glad I did!!! All the pain was worth it and would love to do it again!! I found myself, I found peace, I saw all the beautiful things that life has to offer and I met wonderful people!!!

2

Stjepo Martinovic, Zagreb, Croatia

I have been planning to do this walk for the last 10 years and was able to finally do it last year. I started March 4, 2007 and Finished April 4, 2007. It was everything I expected and more!!! I had horrible feet problems that almost prevented me from continuing El Camino on my 7th day of walking but I did and I am so glad I did!!! All the pain was worth it and would love to do it again!! I found myself, I found peace, I saw all the beautiful things that life has to offer and I met wonderful people!!!

3

Lynne Roberts

I have been planning to do this walk for the last 10 years and was able to finally do it last year. I started March 4, 2007 and Finished April 4, 2007. It was everything I expected and more!!! I had horrible feet problems that almost prevented me from continuing El Camino on my 7th day of walking but I did and I am so glad I did!!! All the pain was worth it and would love to do it again!! I found myself, I found peace, I saw all the beautiful things that life has to offer and I met wonderful people!!!

4

Carlotta (Palermo, Italia)

I have been planning to do this walk for the last 10 years and was able to finally do it last year. I started March 4, 2007 and Finished April 4, 2007. It was everything I expected and more!!! I had horrible feet problems that almost prevented me from continuing El Camino on my 7th day of walking but I did and I am so glad I did!!! All the pain was worth it and would love to do it again!! I found myself, I found peace, I saw all the beautiful things that life has to offer and I met wonderful people!!!

5

Brendan – Denver, Colorado, USA

I have been planning to do this walk for the last 10 years and was able to finally do it last year. I started March 4, 2007 and Finished April 4, 2007. It was everything I expected and more!!! I had horrible feet problems that almost prevented me from continuing El Camino on my 7th day of walking but I did and I am so glad I did!!! All the pain was worth it and would love to do it again!! I found myself, I found peace, I saw all the beautiful things that life has to offer and I met wonderful people!!!

6

Gail Ross – Writing from Scotland

I have been planning to do this walk for the last 10 years and was able to finally do it last year. I started March 4, 2007 and Finished April 4, 2007. It was everything I expected and more!!! I had horrible feet problems that almost prevented me from continuing El Camino on my 7th day of walking but I did and I am so glad I did!!! All the pain was worth it and would love to do it again!! I found myself, I found peace, I saw all the beautiful things that life has to offer and I met wonderful people!!!

7

Paul lanchbury

I have been planning to do this walk for the last 10 years and was able to finally do it last year. I started March 4, 2007 and Finished April 4, 2007. It was everything I expected and more!!! I had horrible feet problems that almost prevented me from continuing El Camino on my 7th day of walking but I did and I am so glad I did!!! All the pain was worth it and would love to do it again!! I found myself, I found peace, I saw all the beautiful things that life has to offer and I met wonderful people!!!

8

Judith Brooke

I have been planning to do this walk for the last 10 years and was able to finally do it last year. I started March 4, 2007 and Finished April 4, 2007. It was everything I expected and more!!! I had horrible feet problems that almost prevented me from continuing El Camino on my 7th day of walking but I did and I am so glad I did!!! All the pain was worth it and would love to do it again!! I found myself, I found peace, I saw all the beautiful things that life has to offer and I met wonderful people!!!

9

Roger-Marc BARBIER

I´ll be doing the Camino again in May 2008 leaving from Le Puy…I´m looking for companhy to cross the Pyrinnes….. Please, leave a msg at : mizu@bol.com.br

0

Nick Crawford, minneapolis minnesota

I´ll be doing the Camino again in May 2008 leaving from Le Puy…I´m looking for companhy to cross the Pyrinnes….. Please, leave a msg at : mizu@bol.com.br

1

Tricia

I´ll be doing the Camino again in May 2008 leaving from Le Puy…I´m looking for companhy to cross the Pyrinnes….. Please, leave a msg at : mizu@bol.com.br

2

Cardenas

I´ll be doing the Camino again in May 2008 leaving from Le Puy…I´m looking for companhy to cross the Pyrinnes….. Please, leave a msg at : mizu@bol.com.br

3

Greg and Lynie Tener

I´ll be doing the Camino again in May 2008 leaving from Le Puy…I´m looking for companhy to cross the Pyrinnes….. Please, leave a msg at : mizu@bol.com.br

4

Hola, Emilio Ayestaran, Fla USA

I´ll be doing the Camino again in May 2008 leaving from Le Puy…I´m looking for companhy to cross the Pyrinnes….. Please, leave a msg at : mizu@bol.com.br

5

Katie-Rose

I´ll be doing the Camino again in May 2008 leaving from Le Puy…I´m looking for companhy to cross the Pyrinnes….. Please, leave a msg at : mizu@bol.com.br

6

maria lucia

I´ll be doing the Camino again in May 2008 leaving from Le Puy…I´m looking for companhy to cross the Pyrinnes….. Please, leave a msg at : mizu@bol.com.br

7

Bill Clune

I´ll be doing the Camino again in May 2008 leaving from Le Puy…I´m looking for companhy to cross the Pyrinnes….. Please, leave a msg at : mizu@bol.com.br

8

Reynaldo ILETO

I´ll be doing the Camino again in May 2008 leaving from Le Puy…I´m looking for companhy to cross the Pyrinnes….. Please, leave a msg at : mizu@bol.com.br

9

Fay

I walked the Portuguese route in July, 2006 and what follows is why I did this hike in the first place. It was really all about family—my own family, my extended family, my human family. I learned about the camino in a 4th grade reader (I attended a Catholic parochial school). It was a story about two children, one destined to stay in the then Spanish colony of St. Augustine, Florida and the other to return to Spain. “Remember St. James and Spain,” the one bid the other farewell. A sidebar explained the story of the Santiago pilgrimage. I remember being quite impressed with the story. On and off over the years, I came across articles about it and thought, someday I’ll do this myself! But it wasn’t until I was touring the Basque region in Navarra in 2000 that I ran into someone who actually walked the camino. A young woman about 25 years old, who was a tour-guide at the cathedral in Hondarribia, told me of her experiences doing the camino herself. Hearing her speak of it gave me hope of accomplishing this journey. So here I was doing it for myself.

My fears, frustrations, sweat and toil doing this were offered for my brother, Anthony P. Tumolo, Jr. who disappeared 40 years ago on one crisp October Saturday. He was an 8th grade student who had just finished delivering papers on his newspaper route, stopped by home briefly and then went out again on his bike a 3:30 p.m. to meet his best friend. He never arrived. He and his belongings were never found. A proper police investigation was not done because two days later, some classmates told the police they saw my brother and ran after him “but couldn’t catch him.” It was a story that would ring out a grain of truth because the whole school knew that my brother was the fastest runner. Twenty-some years later, one of the classmates confessed that they had made up the whole story to cover for the fact that they were late getting back to class because they were smoking and needed a story to account for the time. So the case was tightly shut and he was simply listed as a runaway. This was something he would not have done—he would not have run out on the family or his best friend. He was my good buddy as well. I was about 5 years older than he and had a minor surgery a few weeks before he disappeared. He would get ice packs for me, take my mail up to me and that sort of stuff. Like I said, he would have never run out on us like that. I knew from the start that this was foul play. The laws regarding responsibilities of the police for a missing child were very weak at the time, something that has since been partially corrected in most areas, although the handling of such cases in the United States has yet to be standardized. Several attempts were made to get the police to look at this case again, to no avail. But thirty some years later, I was able to get the police to reopen this case and their efforts led to him to finally be listed with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in Alexandria, Virginia. Although I have little hope that this case will be “solved,” at least I know that stones are being unturned with ruling out that he survived whatever happened to him and that DNA matches to my mitochondrial DNA could be done on any remains that crop up and that sort of thing. Good investigators are working on this and their personal causes were added to my list of intentions that were placed at the tomb of St. James. My list from friends, neighbors, and co-workers was a rather long typed list. In addition, I hand-wrote wishes to extend blessings to people that I met along the way, genuine people who cared. Service workers and locals alike. Also blessings for all the good folks at American Pilgrims, GoCAMINO site, and those at the Confraternity of St. James site whose technical advice helped make my camino possible. And that’s my story. I hope to do another camino, using a different route this coming spring.

0

Guerrero 

I walked the Portuguese route in July, 2006 and what follows is why I did this hike in the first place. It was really all about family—my own family, my extended family, my human family. I learned about the camino in a 4th grade reader (I attended a Catholic parochial school). It was a story about two children, one destined to stay in the then Spanish colony of St. Augustine, Florida and the other to return to Spain. “Remember St. James and Spain,” the one bid the other farewell. A sidebar explained the story of the Santiago pilgrimage. I remember being quite impressed with the story. On and off over the years, I came across articles about it and thought, someday I’ll do this myself! But it wasn’t until I was touring the Basque region in Navarra in 2000 that I ran into someone who actually walked the camino. A young woman about 25 years old, who was a tour-guide at the cathedral in Hondarribia, told me of her experiences doing the camino herself. Hearing her speak of it gave me hope of accomplishing this journey. So here I was doing it for myself.

My fears, frustrations, sweat and toil doing this were offered for my brother, Anthony P. Tumolo, Jr. who disappeared 40 years ago on one crisp October Saturday. He was an 8th grade student who had just finished delivering papers on his newspaper route, stopped by home briefly and then went out again on his bike a 3:30 p.m. to meet his best friend. He never arrived. He and his belongings were never found. A proper police investigation was not done because two days later, some classmates told the police they saw my brother and ran after him “but couldn’t catch him.” It was a story that would ring out a grain of truth because the whole school knew that my brother was the fastest runner. Twenty-some years later, one of the classmates confessed that they had made up the whole story to cover for the fact that they were late getting back to class because they were smoking and needed a story to account for the time. So the case was tightly shut and he was simply listed as a runaway. This was something he would not have done—he would not have run out on the family or his best friend. He was my good buddy as well. I was about 5 years older than he and had a minor surgery a few weeks before he disappeared. He would get ice packs for me, take my mail up to me and that sort of stuff. Like I said, he would have never run out on us like that. I knew from the start that this was foul play. The laws regarding responsibilities of the police for a missing child were very weak at the time, something that has since been partially corrected in most areas, although the handling of such cases in the United States has yet to be standardized. Several attempts were made to get the police to look at this case again, to no avail. But thirty some years later, I was able to get the police to reopen this case and their efforts led to him to finally be listed with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in Alexandria, Virginia. Although I have little hope that this case will be “solved,” at least I know that stones are being unturned with ruling out that he survived whatever happened to him and that DNA matches to my mitochondrial DNA could be done on any remains that crop up and that sort of thing. Good investigators are working on this and their personal causes were added to my list of intentions that were placed at the tomb of St. James. My list from friends, neighbors, and co-workers was a rather long typed list. In addition, I hand-wrote wishes to extend blessings to people that I met along the way, genuine people who cared. Service workers and locals alike. Also blessings for all the good folks at American Pilgrims, GoCAMINO site, and those at the Confraternity of St. James site whose technical advice helped make my camino possible. And that’s my story. I hope to do another camino, using a different route this coming spring.

1

Sarah Smith

I walked the Portuguese route in July, 2006 and what follows is why I did this hike in the first place. It was really all about family—my own family, my extended family, my human family. I learned about the camino in a 4th grade reader (I attended a Catholic parochial school). It was a story about two children, one destined to stay in the then Spanish colony of St. Augustine, Florida and the other to return to Spain. “Remember St. James and Spain,” the one bid the other farewell. A sidebar explained the story of the Santiago pilgrimage. I remember being quite impressed with the story. On and off over the years, I came across articles about it and thought, someday I’ll do this myself! But it wasn’t until I was touring the Basque region in Navarra in 2000 that I ran into someone who actually walked the camino. A young woman about 25 years old, who was a tour-guide at the cathedral in Hondarribia, told me of her experiences doing the camino herself. Hearing her speak of it gave me hope of accomplishing this journey. So here I was doing it for myself.

My fears, frustrations, sweat and toil doing this were offered for my brother, Anthony P. Tumolo, Jr. who disappeared 40 years ago on one crisp October Saturday. He was an 8th grade student who had just finished delivering papers on his newspaper route, stopped by home briefly and then went out again on his bike a 3:30 p.m. to meet his best friend. He never arrived. He and his belongings were never found. A proper police investigation was not done because two days later, some classmates told the police they saw my brother and ran after him “but couldn’t catch him.” It was a story that would ring out a grain of truth because the whole school knew that my brother was the fastest runner. Twenty-some years later, one of the classmates confessed that they had made up the whole story to cover for the fact that they were late getting back to class because they were smoking and needed a story to account for the time. So the case was tightly shut and he was simply listed as a runaway. This was something he would not have done—he would not have run out on the family or his best friend. He was my good buddy as well. I was about 5 years older than he and had a minor surgery a few weeks before he disappeared. He would get ice packs for me, take my mail up to me and that sort of stuff. Like I said, he would have never run out on us like that. I knew from the start that this was foul play. The laws regarding responsibilities of the police for a missing child were very weak at the time, something that has since been partially corrected in most areas, although the handling of such cases in the United States has yet to be standardized. Several attempts were made to get the police to look at this case again, to no avail. But thirty some years later, I was able to get the police to reopen this case and their efforts led to him to finally be listed with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in Alexandria, Virginia. Although I have little hope that this case will be “solved,” at least I know that stones are being unturned with ruling out that he survived whatever happened to him and that DNA matches to my mitochondrial DNA could be done on any remains that crop up and that sort of thing. Good investigators are working on this and their personal causes were added to my list of intentions that were placed at the tomb of St. James. My list from friends, neighbors, and co-workers was a rather long typed list. In addition, I hand-wrote wishes to extend blessings to people that I met along the way, genuine people who cared. Service workers and locals alike. Also blessings for all the good folks at American Pilgrims, GoCAMINO site, and those at the Confraternity of St. James site whose technical advice helped make my camino possible. And that’s my story. I hope to do another camino, using a different route this coming spring.

2

Sheila Devlin

I walked the Portuguese route in July, 2006 and what follows is why I did this hike in the first place. It was really all about family—my own family, my extended family, my human family. I learned about the camino in a 4th grade reader (I attended a Catholic parochial school). It was a story about two children, one destined to stay in the then Spanish colony of St. Augustine, Florida and the other to return to Spain. “Remember St. James and Spain,” the one bid the other farewell. A sidebar explained the story of the Santiago pilgrimage. I remember being quite impressed with the story. On and off over the years, I came across articles about it and thought, someday I’ll do this myself! But it wasn’t until I was touring the Basque region in Navarra in 2000 that I ran into someone who actually walked the camino. A young woman about 25 years old, who was a tour-guide at the cathedral in Hondarribia, told me of her experiences doing the camino herself. Hearing her speak of it gave me hope of accomplishing this journey. So here I was doing it for myself.

My fears, frustrations, sweat and toil doing this were offered for my brother, Anthony P. Tumolo, Jr. who disappeared 40 years ago on one crisp October Saturday. He was an 8th grade student who had just finished delivering papers on his newspaper route, stopped by home briefly and then went out again on his bike a 3:30 p.m. to meet his best friend. He never arrived. He and his belongings were never found. A proper police investigation was not done because two days later, some classmates told the police they saw my brother and ran after him “but couldn’t catch him.” It was a story that would ring out a grain of truth because the whole school knew that my brother was the fastest runner. Twenty-some years later, one of the classmates confessed that they had made up the whole story to cover for the fact that they were late getting back to class because they were smoking and needed a story to account for the time. So the case was tightly shut and he was simply listed as a runaway. This was something he would not have done—he would not have run out on the family or his best friend. He was my good buddy as well. I was about 5 years older than he and had a minor surgery a few weeks before he disappeared. He would get ice packs for me, take my mail up to me and that sort of stuff. Like I said, he would have never run out on us like that. I knew from the start that this was foul play. The laws regarding responsibilities of the police for a missing child were very weak at the time, something that has since been partially corrected in most areas, although the handling of such cases in the United States has yet to be standardized. Several attempts were made to get the police to look at this case again, to no avail. But thirty some years later, I was able to get the police to reopen this case and their efforts led to him to finally be listed with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in Alexandria, Virginia. Although I have little hope that this case will be “solved,” at least I know that stones are being unturned with ruling out that he survived whatever happened to him and that DNA matches to my mitochondrial DNA could be done on any remains that crop up and that sort of thing. Good investigators are working on this and their personal causes were added to my list of intentions that were placed at the tomb of St. James. My list from friends, neighbors, and co-workers was a rather long typed list. In addition, I hand-wrote wishes to extend blessings to people that I met along the way, genuine people who cared. Service workers and locals alike. Also blessings for all the good folks at American Pilgrims, GoCAMINO site, and those at the Confraternity of St. James site whose technical advice helped make my camino possible. And that’s my story. I hope to do another camino, using a different route this coming spring.

3

Emilio Ayestaran

I walked the Portuguese route in July, 2006 and what follows is why I did this hike in the first place. It was really all about family—my own family, my extended family, my human family. I learned about the camino in a 4th grade reader (I attended a Catholic parochial school). It was a story about two children, one destined to stay in the then Spanish colony of St. Augustine, Florida and the other to return to Spain. “Remember St. James and Spain,” the one bid the other farewell. A sidebar explained the story of the Santiago pilgrimage. I remember being quite impressed with the story. On and off over the years, I came across articles about it and thought, someday I’ll do this myself! But it wasn’t until I was touring the Basque region in Navarra in 2000 that I ran into someone who actually walked the camino. A young woman about 25 years old, who was a tour-guide at the cathedral in Hondarribia, told me of her experiences doing the camino herself. Hearing her speak of it gave me hope of accomplishing this journey. So here I was doing it for myself.

My fears, frustrations, sweat and toil doing this were offered for my brother, Anthony P. Tumolo, Jr. who disappeared 40 years ago on one crisp October Saturday. He was an 8th grade student who had just finished delivering papers on his newspaper route, stopped by home briefly and then went out again on his bike a 3:30 p.m. to meet his best friend. He never arrived. He and his belongings were never found. A proper police investigation was not done because two days later, some classmates told the police they saw my brother and ran after him “but couldn’t catch him.” It was a story that would ring out a grain of truth because the whole school knew that my brother was the fastest runner. Twenty-some years later, one of the classmates confessed that they had made up the whole story to cover for the fact that they were late getting back to class because they were smoking and needed a story to account for the time. So the case was tightly shut and he was simply listed as a runaway. This was something he would not have done—he would not have run out on the family or his best friend. He was my good buddy as well. I was about 5 years older than he and had a minor surgery a few weeks before he disappeared. He would get ice packs for me, take my mail up to me and that sort of stuff. Like I said, he would have never run out on us like that. I knew from the start that this was foul play. The laws regarding responsibilities of the police for a missing child were very weak at the time, something that has since been partially corrected in most areas, although the handling of such cases in the United States has yet to be standardized. Several attempts were made to get the police to look at this case again, to no avail. But thirty some years later, I was able to get the police to reopen this case and their efforts led to him to finally be listed with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in Alexandria, Virginia. Although I have little hope that this case will be “solved,” at least I know that stones are being unturned with ruling out that he survived whatever happened to him and that DNA matches to my mitochondrial DNA could be done on any remains that crop up and that sort of thing. Good investigators are working on this and their personal causes were added to my list of intentions that were placed at the tomb of St. James. My list from friends, neighbors, and co-workers was a rather long typed list. In addition, I hand-wrote wishes to extend blessings to people that I met along the way, genuine people who cared. Service workers and locals alike. Also blessings for all the good folks at American Pilgrims, GoCAMINO site, and those at the Confraternity of St. James site whose technical advice helped make my camino possible. And that’s my story. I hope to do another camino, using a different route this coming spring.

4

Ruud van Batenburg

I walked the Portuguese route in July, 2006 and what follows is why I did this hike in the first place. It was really all about family—my own family, my extended family, my human family. I learned about the camino in a 4th grade reader (I attended a Catholic parochial school). It was a story about two children, one destined to stay in the then Spanish colony of St. Augustine, Florida and the other to return to Spain. “Remember St. James and Spain,” the one bid the other farewell. A sidebar explained the story of the Santiago pilgrimage. I remember being quite impressed with the story. On and off over the years, I came across articles about it and thought, someday I’ll do this myself! But it wasn’t until I was touring the Basque region in Navarra in 2000 that I ran into someone who actually walked the camino. A young woman about 25 years old, who was a tour-guide at the cathedral in Hondarribia, told me of her experiences doing the camino herself. Hearing her speak of it gave me hope of accomplishing this journey. So here I was doing it for myself.

My fears, frustrations, sweat and toil doing this were offered for my brother, Anthony P. Tumolo, Jr. who disappeared 40 years ago on one crisp October Saturday. He was an 8th grade student who had just finished delivering papers on his newspaper route, stopped by home briefly and then went out again on his bike a 3:30 p.m. to meet his best friend. He never arrived. He and his belongings were never found. A proper police investigation was not done because two days later, some classmates told the police they saw my brother and ran after him “but couldn’t catch him.” It was a story that would ring out a grain of truth because the whole school knew that my brother was the fastest runner. Twenty-some years later, one of the classmates confessed that they had made up the whole story to cover for the fact that they were late getting back to class because they were smoking and needed a story to account for the time. So the case was tightly shut and he was simply listed as a runaway. This was something he would not have done—he would not have run out on the family or his best friend. He was my good buddy as well. I was about 5 years older than he and had a minor surgery a few weeks before he disappeared. He would get ice packs for me, take my mail up to me and that sort of stuff. Like I said, he would have never run out on us like that. I knew from the start that this was foul play. The laws regarding responsibilities of the police for a missing child were very weak at the time, something that has since been partially corrected in most areas, although the handling of such cases in the United States has yet to be standardized. Several attempts were made to get the police to look at this case again, to no avail. But thirty some years later, I was able to get the police to reopen this case and their efforts led to him to finally be listed with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in Alexandria, Virginia. Although I have little hope that this case will be “solved,” at least I know that stones are being unturned with ruling out that he survived whatever happened to him and that DNA matches to my mitochondrial DNA could be done on any remains that crop up and that sort of thing. Good investigators are working on this and their personal causes were added to my list of intentions that were placed at the tomb of St. James. My list from friends, neighbors, and co-workers was a rather long typed list. In addition, I hand-wrote wishes to extend blessings to people that I met along the way, genuine people who cared. Service workers and locals alike. Also blessings for all the good folks at American Pilgrims, GoCAMINO site, and those at the Confraternity of St. James site whose technical advice helped make my camino possible. And that’s my story. I hope to do another camino, using a different route this coming spring.

5

Pippi Kim

I walked the Portuguese route in July, 2006 and what follows is why I did this hike in the first place. It was really all about family—my own family, my extended family, my human family. I learned about the camino in a 4th grade reader (I attended a Catholic parochial school). It was a story about two children, one destined to stay in the then Spanish colony of St. Augustine, Florida and the other to return to Spain. “Remember St. James and Spain,” the one bid the other farewell. A sidebar explained the story of the Santiago pilgrimage. I remember being quite impressed with the story. On and off over the years, I came across articles about it and thought, someday I’ll do this myself! But it wasn’t until I was touring the Basque region in Navarra in 2000 that I ran into someone who actually walked the camino. A young woman about 25 years old, who was a tour-guide at the cathedral in Hondarribia, told me of her experiences doing the camino herself. Hearing her speak of it gave me hope of accomplishing this journey. So here I was doing it for myself.

My fears, frustrations, sweat and toil doing this were offered for my brother, Anthony P. Tumolo, Jr. who disappeared 40 years ago on one crisp October Saturday. He was an 8th grade student who had just finished delivering papers on his newspaper route, stopped by home briefly and then went out again on his bike a 3:30 p.m. to meet his best friend. He never arrived. He and his belongings were never found. A proper police investigation was not done because two days later, some classmates told the police they saw my brother and ran after him “but couldn’t catch him.” It was a story that would ring out a grain of truth because the whole school knew that my brother was the fastest runner. Twenty-some years later, one of the classmates confessed that they had made up the whole story to cover for the fact that they were late getting back to class because they were smoking and needed a story to account for the time. So the case was tightly shut and he was simply listed as a runaway. This was something he would not have done—he would not have run out on the family or his best friend. He was my good buddy as well. I was about 5 years older than he and had a minor surgery a few weeks before he disappeared. He would get ice packs for me, take my mail up to me and that sort of stuff. Like I said, he would have never run out on us like that. I knew from the start that this was foul play. The laws regarding responsibilities of the police for a missing child were very weak at the time, something that has since been partially corrected in most areas, although the handling of such cases in the United States has yet to be standardized. Several attempts were made to get the police to look at this case again, to no avail. But thirty some years later, I was able to get the police to reopen this case and their efforts led to him to finally be listed with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in Alexandria, Virginia. Although I have little hope that this case will be “solved,” at least I know that stones are being unturned with ruling out that he survived whatever happened to him and that DNA matches to my mitochondrial DNA could be done on any remains that crop up and that sort of thing. Good investigators are working on this and their personal causes were added to my list of intentions that were placed at the tomb of St. James. My list from friends, neighbors, and co-workers was a rather long typed list. In addition, I hand-wrote wishes to extend blessings to people that I met along the way, genuine people who cared. Service workers and locals alike. Also blessings for all the good folks at American Pilgrims, GoCAMINO site, and those at the Confraternity of St. James site whose technical advice helped make my camino possible. And that’s my story. I hope to do another camino, using a different route this coming spring.

6

James Lowe

I walked the Portuguese route in July, 2006 and what follows is why I did this hike in the first place. It was really all about family—my own family, my extended family, my human family. I learned about the camino in a 4th grade reader (I attended a Catholic parochial school). It was a story about two children, one destined to stay in the then Spanish colony of St. Augustine, Florida and the other to return to Spain. “Remember St. James and Spain,” the one bid the other farewell. A sidebar explained the story of the Santiago pilgrimage. I remember being quite impressed with the story. On and off over the years, I came across articles about it and thought, someday I’ll do this myself! But it wasn’t until I was touring the Basque region in Navarra in 2000 that I ran into someone who actually walked the camino. A young woman about 25 years old, who was a tour-guide at the cathedral in Hondarribia, told me of her experiences doing the camino herself. Hearing her speak of it gave me hope of accomplishing this journey. So here I was doing it for myself.

My fears, frustrations, sweat and toil doing this were offered for my brother, Anthony P. Tumolo, Jr. who disappeared 40 years ago on one crisp October Saturday. He was an 8th grade student who had just finished delivering papers on his newspaper route, stopped by home briefly and then went out again on his bike a 3:30 p.m. to meet his best friend. He never arrived. He and his belongings were never found. A proper police investigation was not done because two days later, some classmates told the police they saw my brother and ran after him “but couldn’t catch him.” It was a story that would ring out a grain of truth because the whole school knew that my brother was the fastest runner. Twenty-some years later, one of the classmates confessed that they had made up the whole story to cover for the fact that they were late getting back to class because they were smoking and needed a story to account for the time. So the case was tightly shut and he was simply listed as a runaway. This was something he would not have done—he would not have run out on the family or his best friend. He was my good buddy as well. I was about 5 years older than he and had a minor surgery a few weeks before he disappeared. He would get ice packs for me, take my mail up to me and that sort of stuff. Like I said, he would have never run out on us like that. I knew from the start that this was foul play. The laws regarding responsibilities of the police for a missing child were very weak at the time, something that has since been partially corrected in most areas, although the handling of such cases in the United States has yet to be standardized. Several attempts were made to get the police to look at this case again, to no avail. But thirty some years later, I was able to get the police to reopen this case and their efforts led to him to finally be listed with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in Alexandria, Virginia. Although I have little hope that this case will be “solved,” at least I know that stones are being unturned with ruling out that he survived whatever happened to him and that DNA matches to my mitochondrial DNA could be done on any remains that crop up and that sort of thing. Good investigators are working on this and their personal causes were added to my list of intentions that were placed at the tomb of St. James. My list from friends, neighbors, and co-workers was a rather long typed list. In addition, I hand-wrote wishes to extend blessings to people that I met along the way, genuine people who cared. Service workers and locals alike. Also blessings for all the good folks at American Pilgrims, GoCAMINO site, and those at the Confraternity of St. James site whose technical advice helped make my camino possible. And that’s my story. I hope to do another camino, using a different route this coming spring.

7

Isabel

I walked the Portuguese route in July, 2006 and what follows is why I did this hike in the first place. It was really all about family—my own family, my extended family, my human family. I learned about the camino in a 4th grade reader (I attended a Catholic parochial school). It was a story about two children, one destined to stay in the then Spanish colony of St. Augustine, Florida and the other to return to Spain. “Remember St. James and Spain,” the one bid the other farewell. A sidebar explained the story of the Santiago pilgrimage. I remember being quite impressed with the story. On and off over the years, I came across articles about it and thought, someday I’ll do this myself! But it wasn’t until I was touring the Basque region in Navarra in 2000 that I ran into someone who actually walked the camino. A young woman about 25 years old, who was a tour-guide at the cathedral in Hondarribia, told me of her experiences doing the camino herself. Hearing her speak of it gave me hope of accomplishing this journey. So here I was doing it for myself.

My fears, frustrations, sweat and toil doing this were offered for my brother, Anthony P. Tumolo, Jr. who disappeared 40 years ago on one crisp October Saturday. He was an 8th grade student who had just finished delivering papers on his newspaper route, stopped by home briefly and then went out again on his bike a 3:30 p.m. to meet his best friend. He never arrived. He and his belongings were never found. A proper police investigation was not done because two days later, some classmates told the police they saw my brother and ran after him “but couldn’t catch him.” It was a story that would ring out a grain of truth because the whole school knew that my brother was the fastest runner. Twenty-some years later, one of the classmates confessed that they had made up the whole story to cover for the fact that they were late getting back to class because they were smoking and needed a story to account for the time. So the case was tightly shut and he was simply listed as a runaway. This was something he would not have done—he would not have run out on the family or his best friend. He was my good buddy as well. I was about 5 years older than he and had a minor surgery a few weeks before he disappeared. He would get ice packs for me, take my mail up to me and that sort of stuff. Like I said, he would have never run out on us like that. I knew from the start that this was foul play. The laws regarding responsibilities of the police for a missing child were very weak at the time, something that has since been partially corrected in most areas, although the handling of such cases in the United States has yet to be standardized. Several attempts were made to get the police to look at this case again, to no avail. But thirty some years later, I was able to get the police to reopen this case and their efforts led to him to finally be listed with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in Alexandria, Virginia. Although I have little hope that this case will be “solved,” at least I know that stones are being unturned with ruling out that he survived whatever happened to him and that DNA matches to my mitochondrial DNA could be done on any remains that crop up and that sort of thing. Good investigators are working on this and their personal causes were added to my list of intentions that were placed at the tomb of St. James. My list from friends, neighbors, and co-workers was a rather long typed list. In addition, I hand-wrote wishes to extend blessings to people that I met along the way, genuine people who cared. Service workers and locals alike. Also blessings for all the good folks at American Pilgrims, GoCAMINO site, and those at the Confraternity of St. James site whose technical advice helped make my camino possible. And that’s my story. I hope to do another camino, using a different route this coming spring.

8

Lisa Hagood

I walked the Portuguese route in July, 2006 and what follows is why I did this hike in the first place. It was really all about family—my own family, my extended family, my human family. I learned about the camino in a 4th grade reader (I attended a Catholic parochial school). It was a story about two children, one destined to stay in the then Spanish colony of St. Augustine, Florida and the other to return to Spain. “Remember St. James and Spain,” the one bid the other farewell. A sidebar explained the story of the Santiago pilgrimage. I remember being quite impressed with the story. On and off over the years, I came across articles about it and thought, someday I’ll do this myself! But it wasn’t until I was touring the Basque region in Navarra in 2000 that I ran into someone who actually walked the camino. A young woman about 25 years old, who was a tour-guide at the cathedral in Hondarribia, told me of her experiences doing the camino herself. Hearing her speak of it gave me hope of accomplishing this journey. So here I was doing it for myself.

My fears, frustrations, sweat and toil doing this were offered for my brother, Anthony P. Tumolo, Jr. who disappeared 40 years ago on one crisp October Saturday. He was an 8th grade student who had just finished delivering papers on his newspaper route, stopped by home briefly and then went out again on his bike a 3:30 p.m. to meet his best friend. He never arrived. He and his belongings were never found. A proper police investigation was not done because two days later, some classmates told the police they saw my brother and ran after him “but couldn’t catch him.” It was a story that would ring out a grain of truth because the whole school knew that my brother was the fastest runner. Twenty-some years later, one of the classmates confessed that they had made up the whole story to cover for the fact that they were late getting back to class because they were smoking and needed a story to account for the time. So the case was tightly shut and he was simply listed as a runaway. This was something he would not have done—he would not have run out on the family or his best friend. He was my good buddy as well. I was about 5 years older than he and had a minor surgery a few weeks before he disappeared. He would get ice packs for me, take my mail up to me and that sort of stuff. Like I said, he would have never run out on us like that. I knew from the start that this was foul play. The laws regarding responsibilities of the police for a missing child were very weak at the time, something that has since been partially corrected in most areas, although the handling of such cases in the United States has yet to be standardized. Several attempts were made to get the police to look at this case again, to no avail. But thirty some years later, I was able to get the police to reopen this case and their efforts led to him to finally be listed with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in Alexandria, Virginia. Although I have little hope that this case will be “solved,” at least I know that stones are being unturned with ruling out that he survived whatever happened to him and that DNA matches to my mitochondrial DNA could be done on any remains that crop up and that sort of thing. Good investigators are working on this and their personal causes were added to my list of intentions that were placed at the tomb of St. James. My list from friends, neighbors, and co-workers was a rather long typed list. In addition, I hand-wrote wishes to extend blessings to people that I met along the way, genuine people who cared. Service workers and locals alike. Also blessings for all the good folks at American Pilgrims, GoCAMINO site, and those at the Confraternity of St. James site whose technical advice helped make my camino possible. And that’s my story. I hope to do another camino, using a different route this coming spring.

9

Lee Alison Crawford

Todos os que fazem o Caminho de Santiago tem um desejo de “dar um tempo”, um descanso da mesmice da vida, do trabalho, do chefe, do cachorro, o que seja. E esta ruptura se dá por completo uns dias depois de iniciada a jornada. O problema está na volta. Eu levei 3 meses para me re-estabelecer em minha rotina. Sentia muita falta de tudo o que vivi ao longo daqueles mais de um milhao de passos, de abandonar aquela vida comunitária, as pessoas, as flores, a Espanha. E agora vivo nao na ilusão, mas na certeza de votar nas proximas férias a fazer o caminho novamente.

Abraço de Brasil, TODO SE CUMPLE

0

JUAN MANUEL

Todos os que fazem o Caminho de Santiago tem um desejo de “dar um tempo”, um descanso da mesmice da vida, do trabalho, do chefe, do cachorro, o que seja. E esta ruptura se dá por completo uns dias depois de iniciada a jornada. O problema está na volta. Eu levei 3 meses para me re-estabelecer em minha rotina. Sentia muita falta de tudo o que vivi ao longo daqueles mais de um milhao de passos, de abandonar aquela vida comunitária, as pessoas, as flores, a Espanha. E agora vivo nao na ilusão, mas na certeza de votar nas proximas férias a fazer o caminho novamente.

Abraço de Brasil, TODO SE CUMPLE

1

Gernot van der Meulen

Todos os que fazem o Caminho de Santiago tem um desejo de “dar um tempo”, um descanso da mesmice da vida, do trabalho, do chefe, do cachorro, o que seja. E esta ruptura se dá por completo uns dias depois de iniciada a jornada. O problema está na volta. Eu levei 3 meses para me re-estabelecer em minha rotina. Sentia muita falta de tudo o que vivi ao longo daqueles mais de um milhao de passos, de abandonar aquela vida comunitária, as pessoas, as flores, a Espanha. E agora vivo nao na ilusão, mas na certeza de votar nas proximas férias a fazer o caminho novamente.

Abraço de Brasil, TODO SE CUMPLE

2

Colleen Shannon

Todos os que fazem o Caminho de Santiago tem um desejo de “dar um tempo”, um descanso da mesmice da vida, do trabalho, do chefe, do cachorro, o que seja. E esta ruptura se dá por completo uns dias depois de iniciada a jornada. O problema está na volta. Eu levei 3 meses para me re-estabelecer em minha rotina. Sentia muita falta de tudo o que vivi ao longo daqueles mais de um milhao de passos, de abandonar aquela vida comunitária, as pessoas, as flores, a Espanha. E agora vivo nao na ilusão, mas na certeza de votar nas proximas férias a fazer o caminho novamente.

Abraço de Brasil, TODO SE CUMPLE

3

Kevin Crampton & Aurelia

Todos os que fazem o Caminho de Santiago tem um desejo de “dar um tempo”, um descanso da mesmice da vida, do trabalho, do chefe, do cachorro, o que seja. E esta ruptura se dá por completo uns dias depois de iniciada a jornada. O problema está na volta. Eu levei 3 meses para me re-estabelecer em minha rotina. Sentia muita falta de tudo o que vivi ao longo daqueles mais de um milhao de passos, de abandonar aquela vida comunitária, as pessoas, as flores, a Espanha. E agora vivo nao na ilusão, mas na certeza de votar nas proximas férias a fazer o caminho novamente.

Abraço de Brasil, TODO SE CUMPLE

4

Sanna, Finland

Todos os que fazem o Caminho de Santiago tem um desejo de “dar um tempo”, um descanso da mesmice da vida, do trabalho, do chefe, do cachorro, o que seja. E esta ruptura se dá por completo uns dias depois de iniciada a jornada. O problema está na volta. Eu levei 3 meses para me re-estabelecer em minha rotina. Sentia muita falta de tudo o que vivi ao longo daqueles mais de um milhao de passos, de abandonar aquela vida comunitária, as pessoas, as flores, a Espanha. E agora vivo nao na ilusão, mas na certeza de votar nas proximas férias a fazer o caminho novamente.

Abraço de Brasil, TODO SE CUMPLE

5

Everton de Brito Dias

Todos os que fazem o Caminho de Santiago tem um desejo de “dar um tempo”, um descanso da mesmice da vida, do trabalho, do chefe, do cachorro, o que seja. E esta ruptura se dá por completo uns dias depois de iniciada a jornada. O problema está na volta. Eu levei 3 meses para me re-estabelecer em minha rotina. Sentia muita falta de tudo o que vivi ao longo daqueles mais de um milhao de passos, de abandonar aquela vida comunitária, as pessoas, as flores, a Espanha. E agora vivo nao na ilusão, mas na certeza de votar nas proximas férias a fazer o caminho novamente.

Abraço de Brasil, TODO SE CUMPLE

6

Trish Stewart

Todos os que fazem o Caminho de Santiago tem um desejo de “dar um tempo”, um descanso da mesmice da vida, do trabalho, do chefe, do cachorro, o que seja. E esta ruptura se dá por completo uns dias depois de iniciada a jornada. O problema está na volta. Eu levei 3 meses para me re-estabelecer em minha rotina. Sentia muita falta de tudo o que vivi ao longo daqueles mais de um milhao de passos, de abandonar aquela vida comunitária, as pessoas, as flores, a Espanha. E agora vivo nao na ilusão, mas na certeza de votar nas proximas férias a fazer o caminho novamente.

Abraço de Brasil, TODO SE CUMPLE

7

Theresa Moloney

Todos os que fazem o Caminho de Santiago tem um desejo de “dar um tempo”, um descanso da mesmice da vida, do trabalho, do chefe, do cachorro, o que seja. E esta ruptura se dá por completo uns dias depois de iniciada a jornada. O problema está na volta. Eu levei 3 meses para me re-estabelecer em minha rotina. Sentia muita falta de tudo o que vivi ao longo daqueles mais de um milhao de passos, de abandonar aquela vida comunitária, as pessoas, as flores, a Espanha. E agora vivo nao na ilusão, mas na certeza de votar nas proximas férias a fazer o caminho novamente.

Abraço de Brasil, TODO SE CUMPLE

8

Mariusz Wesolowski

Todos os que fazem o Caminho de Santiago tem um desejo de “dar um tempo”, um descanso da mesmice da vida, do trabalho, do chefe, do cachorro, o que seja. E esta ruptura se dá por completo uns dias depois de iniciada a jornada. O problema está na volta. Eu levei 3 meses para me re-estabelecer em minha rotina. Sentia muita falta de tudo o que vivi ao longo daqueles mais de um milhao de passos, de abandonar aquela vida comunitária, as pessoas, as flores, a Espanha. E agora vivo nao na ilusão, mas na certeza de votar nas proximas férias a fazer o caminho novamente.

Abraço de Brasil, TODO SE CUMPLE

9

Lisa Hagood

In December 2004, our local newspaper had an article about the Camino in the Sunday travel section. I read the article and was intrigued. I called my daughter, who had spent the prior school year studying abroad in Granada, and asked her about the Camino. She told me that she had heard of it while in Spain and knew a couple of people who had walked it. Then she said to me “You can do it, Mom”. That’s all I had to hear. I went online and bought books on the Camino and began to read. I cut out the article and put it up on my pantry door (it is still there). That Christmas, my daughter was home from college and told me she wanted to walk the Camino with me the next spring. We made plans, got our supplies and off we went. I had never left my husband alone for so long but he was fine with it. I did not know what to expect. I don’t know why I went but I knew that I had to. I couldn’t explain to my friends or family, I just knew that it was something that I had to do. We had lots of support and encouragement but I was 52 years old and in good shape but never had I attempted something so physically, and little did I know, spiritually and psychologically, demanding. I just had to do it. I just had to. We started on April 19, 2005 in SJPP and finished in Santiago on May 24th. It took us 34 days. There were days where I cried, days I was frustrated, days that I was overjoyed. The gamut of emotions was unexpected and unexplicable. Returning home was so very difficult. My daughter and I cried, and I mean sobbed, when we left Santiago. We didn’t want to return. 34 days on the Camino taught us so much. I wish that I had the time to go into this but those of you who have walked know what I mean. I heard someone say that there is the Camino you walk and the Camino you live. Living the Camino is more difficult than walking it. I think that is why I want to go back. There are so many lessons that are learned on the Camino but the routine of everyday life dulls the memory of those lessons. I want to return but alone next time. It was nice being with my daughter because we have a memory that bonds us forever. But I think that walking the Camino alone will give me a different perspective, one that I really want to experience. What called me to the Camino? I don’t know. Did it make any significant changes in my life? In some ways yes and other ways, no. I read once that the changes brought about by the Camino can take years to make themselves known. I don’t know about that. I think that if people want to change, it must be a conscious decision and the experience of the Camino helps those changes to come about. I think about the Camino every day. It is always with me. The memory of my experiences on the Camino, the people I met, the emotions I felt will never leave. Maybe that is what is meant by the Camino we live.

0

Simon Egan

In December 2004, our local newspaper had an article about the Camino in the Sunday travel section. I read the article and was intrigued. I called my daughter, who had spent the prior school year studying abroad in Granada, and asked her about the Camino. She told me that she had heard of it while in Spain and knew a couple of people who had walked it. Then she said to me “You can do it, Mom”. That’s all I had to hear. I went online and bought books on the Camino and began to read. I cut out the article and put it up on my pantry door (it is still there). That Christmas, my daughter was home from college and told me she wanted to walk the Camino with me the next spring. We made plans, got our supplies and off we went. I had never left my husband alone for so long but he was fine with it. I did not know what to expect. I don’t know why I went but I knew that I had to. I couldn’t explain to my friends or family, I just knew that it was something that I had to do. We had lots of support and encouragement but I was 52 years old and in good shape but never had I attempted something so physically, and little did I know, spiritually and psychologically, demanding. I just had to do it. I just had to. We started on April 19, 2005 in SJPP and finished in Santiago on May 24th. It took us 34 days. There were days where I cried, days I was frustrated, days that I was overjoyed. The gamut of emotions was unexpected and unexplicable. Returning home was so very difficult. My daughter and I cried, and I mean sobbed, when we left Santiago. We didn’t want to return. 34 days on the Camino taught us so much. I wish that I had the time to go into this but those of you who have walked know what I mean. I heard someone say that there is the Camino you walk and the Camino you live. Living the Camino is more difficult than walking it. I think that is why I want to go back. There are so many lessons that are learned on the Camino but the routine of everyday life dulls the memory of those lessons. I want to return but alone next time. It was nice being with my daughter because we have a memory that bonds us forever. But I think that walking the Camino alone will give me a different perspective, one that I really want to experience. What called me to the Camino? I don’t know. Did it make any significant changes in my life? In some ways yes and other ways, no. I read once that the changes brought about by the Camino can take years to make themselves known. I don’t know about that. I think that if people want to change, it must be a conscious decision and the experience of the Camino helps those changes to come about. I think about the Camino every day. It is always with me. The memory of my experiences on the Camino, the people I met, the emotions I felt will never leave. Maybe that is what is meant by the Camino we live.

1

suzanne bradbury

In December 2004, our local newspaper had an article about the Camino in the Sunday travel section. I read the article and was intrigued. I called my daughter, who had spent the prior school year studying abroad in Granada, and asked her about the Camino. She told me that she had heard of it while in Spain and knew a couple of people who had walked it. Then she said to me “You can do it, Mom”. That’s all I had to hear. I went online and bought books on the Camino and began to read. I cut out the article and put it up on my pantry door (it is still there). That Christmas, my daughter was home from college and told me she wanted to walk the Camino with me the next spring. We made plans, got our supplies and off we went. I had never left my husband alone for so long but he was fine with it. I did not know what to expect. I don’t know why I went but I knew that I had to. I couldn’t explain to my friends or family, I just knew that it was something that I had to do. We had lots of support and encouragement but I was 52 years old and in good shape but never had I attempted something so physically, and little did I know, spiritually and psychologically, demanding. I just had to do it. I just had to. We started on April 19, 2005 in SJPP and finished in Santiago on May 24th. It took us 34 days. There were days where I cried, days I was frustrated, days that I was overjoyed. The gamut of emotions was unexpected and unexplicable. Returning home was so very difficult. My daughter and I cried, and I mean sobbed, when we left Santiago. We didn’t want to return. 34 days on the Camino taught us so much. I wish that I had the time to go into this but those of you who have walked know what I mean. I heard someone say that there is the Camino you walk and the Camino you live. Living the Camino is more difficult than walking it. I think that is why I want to go back. There are so many lessons that are learned on the Camino but the routine of everyday life dulls the memory of those lessons. I want to return but alone next time. It was nice being with my daughter because we have a memory that bonds us forever. But I think that walking the Camino alone will give me a different perspective, one that I really want to experience. What called me to the Camino? I don’t know. Did it make any significant changes in my life? In some ways yes and other ways, no. I read once that the changes brought about by the Camino can take years to make themselves known. I don’t know about that. I think that if people want to change, it must be a conscious decision and the experience of the Camino helps those changes to come about. I think about the Camino every day. It is always with me. The memory of my experiences on the Camino, the people I met, the emotions I felt will never leave. Maybe that is what is meant by the Camino we live.

2

naomy ruiz

In December 2004, our local newspaper had an article about the Camino in the Sunday travel section. I read the article and was intrigued. I called my daughter, who had spent the prior school year studying abroad in Granada, and asked her about the Camino. She told me that she had heard of it while in Spain and knew a couple of people who had walked it. Then she said to me “You can do it, Mom”. That’s all I had to hear. I went online and bought books on the Camino and began to read. I cut out the article and put it up on my pantry door (it is still there). That Christmas, my daughter was home from college and told me she wanted to walk the Camino with me the next spring. We made plans, got our supplies and off we went. I had never left my husband alone for so long but he was fine with it. I did not know what to expect. I don’t know why I went but I knew that I had to. I couldn’t explain to my friends or family, I just knew that it was something that I had to do. We had lots of support and encouragement but I was 52 years old and in good shape but never had I attempted something so physically, and little did I know, spiritually and psychologically, demanding. I just had to do it. I just had to. We started on April 19, 2005 in SJPP and finished in Santiago on May 24th. It took us 34 days. There were days where I cried, days I was frustrated, days that I was overjoyed. The gamut of emotions was unexpected and unexplicable. Returning home was so very difficult. My daughter and I cried, and I mean sobbed, when we left Santiago. We didn’t want to return. 34 days on the Camino taught us so much. I wish that I had the time to go into this but those of you who have walked know what I mean. I heard someone say that there is the Camino you walk and the Camino you live. Living the Camino is more difficult than walking it. I think that is why I want to go back. There are so many lessons that are learned on the Camino but the routine of everyday life dulls the memory of those lessons. I want to return but alone next time. It was nice being with my daughter because we have a memory that bonds us forever. But I think that walking the Camino alone will give me a different perspective, one that I really want to experience. What called me to the Camino? I don’t know. Did it make any significant changes in my life? In some ways yes and other ways, no. I read once that the changes brought about by the Camino can take years to make themselves known. I don’t know about that. I think that if people want to change, it must be a conscious decision and the experience of the Camino helps those changes to come about. I think about the Camino every day. It is always with me. The memory of my experiences on the Camino, the people I met, the emotions I felt will never leave. Maybe that is what is meant by the Camino we live.

3

Julian Lentaigne

In December 2004, our local newspaper had an article about the Camino in the Sunday travel section. I read the article and was intrigued. I called my daughter, who had spent the prior school year studying abroad in Granada, and asked her about the Camino. She told me that she had heard of it while in Spain and knew a couple of people who had walked it. Then she said to me “You can do it, Mom”. That’s all I had to hear. I went online and bought books on the Camino and began to read. I cut out the article and put it up on my pantry door (it is still there). That Christmas, my daughter was home from college and told me she wanted to walk the Camino with me the next spring. We made plans, got our supplies and off we went. I had never left my husband alone for so long but he was fine with it. I did not know what to expect. I don’t know why I went but I knew that I had to. I couldn’t explain to my friends or family, I just knew that it was something that I had to do. We had lots of support and encouragement but I was 52 years old and in good shape but never had I attempted something so physically, and little did I know, spiritually and psychologically, demanding. I just had to do it. I just had to. We started on April 19, 2005 in SJPP and finished in Santiago on May 24th. It took us 34 days. There were days where I cried, days I was frustrated, days that I was overjoyed. The gamut of emotions was unexpected and unexplicable. Returning home was so very difficult. My daughter and I cried, and I mean sobbed, when we left Santiago. We didn’t want to return. 34 days on the Camino taught us so much. I wish that I had the time to go into this but those of you who have walked know what I mean. I heard someone say that there is the Camino you walk and the Camino you live. Living the Camino is more difficult than walking it. I think that is why I want to go back. There are so many lessons that are learned on the Camino but the routine of everyday life dulls the memory of those lessons. I want to return but alone next time. It was nice being with my daughter because we have a memory that bonds us forever. But I think that walking the Camino alone will give me a different perspective, one that I really want to experience. What called me to the Camino? I don’t know. Did it make any significant changes in my life? In some ways yes and other ways, no. I read once that the changes brought about by the Camino can take years to make themselves known. I don’t know about that. I think that if people want to change, it must be a conscious decision and the experience of the Camino helps those changes to come about. I think about the Camino every day. It is always with me. The memory of my experiences on the Camino, the people I met, the emotions I felt will never leave. Maybe that is what is meant by the Camino we live.

4

Lee Higgins

In December 2004, our local newspaper had an article about the Camino in the Sunday travel section. I read the article and was intrigued. I called my daughter, who had spent the prior school year studying abroad in Granada, and asked her about the Camino. She told me that she had heard of it while in Spain and knew a couple of people who had walked it. Then she said to me “You can do it, Mom”. That’s all I had to hear. I went online and bought books on the Camino and began to read. I cut out the article and put it up on my pantry door (it is still there). That Christmas, my daughter was home from college and told me she wanted to walk the Camino with me the next spring. We made plans, got our supplies and off we went. I had never left my husband alone for so long but he was fine with it. I did not know what to expect. I don’t know why I went but I knew that I had to. I couldn’t explain to my friends or family, I just knew that it was something that I had to do. We had lots of support and encouragement but I was 52 years old and in good shape but never had I attempted something so physically, and little did I know, spiritually and psychologically, demanding. I just had to do it. I just had to. We started on April 19, 2005 in SJPP and finished in Santiago on May 24th. It took us 34 days. There were days where I cried, days I was frustrated, days that I was overjoyed. The gamut of emotions was unexpected and unexplicable. Returning home was so very difficult. My daughter and I cried, and I mean sobbed, when we left Santiago. We didn’t want to return. 34 days on the Camino taught us so much. I wish that I had the time to go into this but those of you who have walked know what I mean. I heard someone say that there is the Camino you walk and the Camino you live. Living the Camino is more difficult than walking it. I think that is why I want to go back. There are so many lessons that are learned on the Camino but the routine of everyday life dulls the memory of those lessons. I want to return but alone next time. It was nice being with my daughter because we have a memory that bonds us forever. But I think that walking the Camino alone will give me a different perspective, one that I really want to experience. What called me to the Camino? I don’t know. Did it make any significant changes in my life? In some ways yes and other ways, no. I read once that the changes brought about by the Camino can take years to make themselves known. I don’t know about that. I think that if people want to change, it must be a conscious decision and the experience of the Camino helps those changes to come about. I think about the Camino every day. It is always with me. The memory of my experiences on the Camino, the people I met, the emotions I felt will never leave. Maybe that is what is meant by the Camino we live.

5

Alexis

In December 2004, our local newspaper had an article about the Camino in the Sunday travel section. I read the article and was intrigued. I called my daughter, who had spent the prior school year studying abroad in Granada, and asked her about the Camino. She told me that she had heard of it while in Spain and knew a couple of people who had walked it. Then she said to me “You can do it, Mom”. That’s all I had to hear. I went online and bought books on the Camino and began to read. I cut out the article and put it up on my pantry door (it is still there). That Christmas, my daughter was home from college and told me she wanted to walk the Camino with me the next spring. We made plans, got our supplies and off we went. I had never left my husband alone for so long but he was fine with it. I did not know what to expect. I don’t know why I went but I knew that I had to. I couldn’t explain to my friends or family, I just knew that it was something that I had to do. We had lots of support and encouragement but I was 52 years old and in good shape but never had I attempted something so physically, and little did I know, spiritually and psychologically, demanding. I just had to do it. I just had to. We started on April 19, 2005 in SJPP and finished in Santiago on May 24th. It took us 34 days. There were days where I cried, days I was frustrated, days that I was overjoyed. The gamut of emotions was unexpected and unexplicable. Returning home was so very difficult. My daughter and I cried, and I mean sobbed, when we left Santiago. We didn’t want to return. 34 days on the Camino taught us so much. I wish that I had the time to go into this but those of you who have walked know what I mean. I heard someone say that there is the Camino you walk and the Camino you live. Living the Camino is more difficult than walking it. I think that is why I want to go back. There are so many lessons that are learned on the Camino but the routine of everyday life dulls the memory of those lessons. I want to return but alone next time. It was nice being with my daughter because we have a memory that bonds us forever. But I think that walking the Camino alone will give me a different perspective, one that I really want to experience. What called me to the Camino? I don’t know. Did it make any significant changes in my life? In some ways yes and other ways, no. I read once that the changes brought about by the Camino can take years to make themselves known. I don’t know about that. I think that if people want to change, it must be a conscious decision and the experience of the Camino helps those changes to come about. I think about the Camino every day. It is always with me. The memory of my experiences on the Camino, the people I met, the emotions I felt will never leave. Maybe that is what is meant by the Camino we live.

6

Janice Cowher Russo 

In December 2004, our local newspaper had an article about the Camino in the Sunday travel section. I read the article and was intrigued. I called my daughter, who had spent the prior school year studying abroad in Granada, and asked her about the Camino. She told me that she had heard of it while in Spain and knew a couple of people who had walked it. Then she said to me “You can do it, Mom”. That’s all I had to hear. I went online and bought books on the Camino and began to read. I cut out the article and put it up on my pantry door (it is still there). That Christmas, my daughter was home from college and told me she wanted to walk the Camino with me the next spring. We made plans, got our supplies and off we went. I had never left my husband alone for so long but he was fine with it. I did not know what to expect. I don’t know why I went but I knew that I had to. I couldn’t explain to my friends or family, I just knew that it was something that I had to do. We had lots of support and encouragement but I was 52 years old and in good shape but never had I attempted something so physically, and little did I know, spiritually and psychologically, demanding. I just had to do it. I just had to. We started on April 19, 2005 in SJPP and finished in Santiago on May 24th. It took us 34 days. There were days where I cried, days I was frustrated, days that I was overjoyed. The gamut of emotions was unexpected and unexplicable. Returning home was so very difficult. My daughter and I cried, and I mean sobbed, when we left Santiago. We didn’t want to return. 34 days on the Camino taught us so much. I wish that I had the time to go into this but those of you who have walked know what I mean. I heard someone say that there is the Camino you walk and the Camino you live. Living the Camino is more difficult than walking it. I think that is why I want to go back. There are so many lessons that are learned on the Camino but the routine of everyday life dulls the memory of those lessons. I want to return but alone next time. It was nice being with my daughter because we have a memory that bonds us forever. But I think that walking the Camino alone will give me a different perspective, one that I really want to experience. What called me to the Camino? I don’t know. Did it make any significant changes in my life? In some ways yes and other ways, no. I read once that the changes brought about by the Camino can take years to make themselves known. I don’t know about that. I think that if people want to change, it must be a conscious decision and the experience of the Camino helps those changes to come about. I think about the Camino every day. It is always with me. The memory of my experiences on the Camino, the people I met, the emotions I felt will never leave. Maybe that is what is meant by the Camino we live.

7

Lara Iversen

In December 2004, our local newspaper had an article about the Camino in the Sunday travel section. I read the article and was intrigued. I called my daughter, who had spent the prior school year studying abroad in Granada, and asked her about the Camino. She told me that she had heard of it while in Spain and knew a couple of people who had walked it. Then she said to me “You can do it, Mom”. That’s all I had to hear. I went online and bought books on the Camino and began to read. I cut out the article and put it up on my pantry door (it is still there). That Christmas, my daughter was home from college and told me she wanted to walk the Camino with me the next spring. We made plans, got our supplies and off we went. I had never left my husband alone for so long but he was fine with it. I did not know what to expect. I don’t know why I went but I knew that I had to. I couldn’t explain to my friends or family, I just knew that it was something that I had to do. We had lots of support and encouragement but I was 52 years old and in good shape but never had I attempted something so physically, and little did I know, spiritually and psychologically, demanding. I just had to do it. I just had to. We started on April 19, 2005 in SJPP and finished in Santiago on May 24th. It took us 34 days. There were days where I cried, days I was frustrated, days that I was overjoyed. The gamut of emotions was unexpected and unexplicable. Returning home was so very difficult. My daughter and I cried, and I mean sobbed, when we left Santiago. We didn’t want to return. 34 days on the Camino taught us so much. I wish that I had the time to go into this but those of you who have walked know what I mean. I heard someone say that there is the Camino you walk and the Camino you live. Living the Camino is more difficult than walking it. I think that is why I want to go back. There are so many lessons that are learned on the Camino but the routine of everyday life dulls the memory of those lessons. I want to return but alone next time. It was nice being with my daughter because we have a memory that bonds us forever. But I think that walking the Camino alone will give me a different perspective, one that I really want to experience. What called me to the Camino? I don’t know. Did it make any significant changes in my life? In some ways yes and other ways, no. I read once that the changes brought about by the Camino can take years to make themselves known. I don’t know about that. I think that if people want to change, it must be a conscious decision and the experience of the Camino helps those changes to come about. I think about the Camino every day. It is always with me. The memory of my experiences on the Camino, the people I met, the emotions I felt will never leave. Maybe that is what is meant by the Camino we live.

8

Laara Delain

In December 2004, our local newspaper had an article about the Camino in the Sunday travel section. I read the article and was intrigued. I called my daughter, who had spent the prior school year studying abroad in Granada, and asked her about the Camino. She told me that she had heard of it while in Spain and knew a couple of people who had walked it. Then she said to me “You can do it, Mom”. That’s all I had to hear. I went online and bought books on the Camino and began to read. I cut out the article and put it up on my pantry door (it is still there). That Christmas, my daughter was home from college and told me she wanted to walk the Camino with me the next spring. We made plans, got our supplies and off we went. I had never left my husband alone for so long but he was fine with it. I did not know what to expect. I don’t know why I went but I knew that I had to. I couldn’t explain to my friends or family, I just knew that it was something that I had to do. We had lots of support and encouragement but I was 52 years old and in good shape but never had I attempted something so physically, and little did I know, spiritually and psychologically, demanding. I just had to do it. I just had to. We started on April 19, 2005 in SJPP and finished in Santiago on May 24th. It took us 34 days. There were days where I cried, days I was frustrated, days that I was overjoyed. The gamut of emotions was unexpected and unexplicable. Returning home was so very difficult. My daughter and I cried, and I mean sobbed, when we left Santiago. We didn’t want to return. 34 days on the Camino taught us so much. I wish that I had the time to go into this but those of you who have walked know what I mean. I heard someone say that there is the Camino you walk and the Camino you live. Living the Camino is more difficult than walking it. I think that is why I want to go back. There are so many lessons that are learned on the Camino but the routine of everyday life dulls the memory of those lessons. I want to return but alone next time. It was nice being with my daughter because we have a memory that bonds us forever. But I think that walking the Camino alone will give me a different perspective, one that I really want to experience. What called me to the Camino? I don’t know. Did it make any significant changes in my life? In some ways yes and other ways, no. I read once that the changes brought about by the Camino can take years to make themselves known. I don’t know about that. I think that if people want to change, it must be a conscious decision and the experience of the Camino helps those changes to come about. I think about the Camino every day. It is always with me. The memory of my experiences on the Camino, the people I met, the emotions I felt will never leave. Maybe that is what is meant by the Camino we live.

9

Phil Finnegan

The local parish priest organized the cammino for a group of 48 pelligrins to make the last 100km only, I wanted to make part of it at first for many reasons, and I was still reluctant when I went and started it. But later when I was in the cammino reflecting on the sense of doing it, and attending the everyday mass the priest made in the open I understood the real meaning of the cammino and my role in it and in the life, and now 4 days after coming back from the cammino I feel a real change in my life, hoping I remain in this situation forever, and if not I know the cure which is another cammino and surely for a longer distance.

Thanks for Don Daniele who organized the cammino and for the group who acted as a physical and moral support for all of us to continue.

GRAZIE da tutto il mio cuore…

0

paule guerard

The local parish priest organized the cammino for a group of 48 pelligrins to make the last 100km only, I wanted to make part of it at first for many reasons, and I was still reluctant when I went and started it. But later when I was in the cammino reflecting on the sense of doing it, and attending the everyday mass the priest made in the open I understood the real meaning of the cammino and my role in it and in the life, and now 4 days after coming back from the cammino I feel a real change in my life, hoping I remain in this situation forever, and if not I know the cure which is another cammino and surely for a longer distance.

Thanks for Don Daniele who organized the cammino and for the group who acted as a physical and moral support for all of us to continue.

GRAZIE da tutto il mio cuore…

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Matt Deveney

The local parish priest organized the cammino for a group of 48 pelligrins to make the last 100km only, I wanted to make part of it at first for many reasons, and I was still reluctant when I went and started it. But later when I was in the cammino reflecting on the sense of doing it, and attending the everyday mass the priest made in the open I understood the real meaning of the cammino and my role in it and in the life, and now 4 days after coming back from the cammino I feel a real change in my life, hoping I remain in this situation forever, and if not I know the cure which is another cammino and surely for a longer distance.

Thanks for Don Daniele who organized the cammino and for the group who acted as a physical and moral support for all of us to continue.

GRAZIE da tutto il mio cuore…

2

Piers Nicholson

The local parish priest organized the cammino for a group of 48 pelligrins to make the last 100km only, I wanted to make part of it at first for many reasons, and I was still reluctant when I went and started it. But later when I was in the cammino reflecting on the sense of doing it, and attending the everyday mass the priest made in the open I understood the real meaning of the cammino and my role in it and in the life, and now 4 days after coming back from the cammino I feel a real change in my life, hoping I remain in this situation forever, and if not I know the cure which is another cammino and surely for a longer distance.

Thanks for Don Daniele who organized the cammino and for the group who acted as a physical and moral support for all of us to continue.

GRAZIE da tutto il mio cuore…

3